Why Uxbridge?

The Town of Uxbridge is situated in a beautiful valley on the northern slope of the Oak Ridges Moraine, about 64km northeast of Toronto, Ontario.

Uxbridge has much to offer by way of recreation, entertainment, heritage and culture, a thriving arts community and the opportunity to participate in any one of the countless volunteer organizations that actively contribute to the quality of life in this vibrant community that we are all so proud of.

Uxbridge has been officially designated as The Trail Capital of Canada, in recognition of the extensive and growing network of trails throughout the township.

The History of Uxbridge

The first settlers in the area were Quakers who started arriving in 1806 from the Catawissa area of Pennsylvania. These two municipalities, which share a Quaker heritage, were twinned in 1982, and ongoing friendships have developed.

The Uxbridge Friends Meeting House which overlooks the town from Quaker Hill was built in 1820, and is the community’s oldest building.

The Toronto and Nipissing Railroad arrived in Uxbridge in 1871, and for over a decade Uxbridge was the headquarters of the railway.

In 1954, Uxbridge became the second town in Canada to receive an official coat-of-arms which is displayed on the front of the Music Hall. The latter building has been restored, and is a centre for drama and musical performances.

In 1973, Uxbridge Town became a part of Uxbridge Township, along with Scott Township, in the new Region of Durham.

The Uxbridge Fall Fair takes place each September in Elgin Park, which is situated alongside of Elgin Pond. It was here that Sir John A. MacDonald held the first of his huge picnics when seeking re-election.

While among earlier industries were the Uxbridge Piano and Organ Company, and the Gold Medal Radio and Phonograph Company, Uxbridge is now the home of Glitsch Canada and various other industries.

Uxbridge Public Library was erected in 1887 from funds provided by entrepreneur, politician, and businessman, Joseph Gould. It’s centennial in 1987 was celebrated with the opening of a large addition.

The Uxbridge Arena and Recreation Centre, built in 1978, with a second ice pad added in 1997, is always a hive of activity, and Uxpool provides a host of events for swimmers.

The Uxbridge-Scott Museum provides a focal point for the Township’s history.

The Thomas Foster Memorial Temple, erected in 1935-36 by the former mayor of Toronto, is situated a short distance north of town, as is the former home of L.M. Montgomery, the author of Anne of Green Gables. She lived in the area from 1911 to 1926, and wrote half of her books there.

The surrounding township contains the hamlets of Zephyr, Sandford, Udora, Leaskdale, Sandy Hook, Siloam, Goodwood, Coppins Corners, Glen Major, Glasgow and Altona.